Regret Everything: OMG, We’re All Writers! [Full Post]
In “Regret Everything,” comedian Will Hines gives a weekly update on the thoughts that are gnawing at his brain.

It’s ironic that as technology gets more and more magical that the oldest of mediums — the written word — has come back so strongly. I communicate almost completely by typing these days. I recently emailed someone, “is there anyway we could talk with our voices to figure this out” before I remembered that I was sending that message over an actual phone.And that’s not just me. Everyone is focused on writing FIRST. Sure, it’s mostly in short bursts: Facebook status, twitter bios, YouTube comments, smart phone email signature, clever IM handles, inside jokes in passwords, tumblr re-blogs and gchats. But still, it’s words. We are all writers, even if it’s just 140 characters at a time.The last time culture was probably so tied to writing might be the pre-telephone era of the late 1800s. In London, the post (yeah that’s right, I said “the post,” which impossible to hear in anything but a British accent) would deliver letters up to five times a day. It was common then to receive a message, read it with the postman standing there, and dash off a quick note for him to take with him. It’s not so hard to imagine Jane Austen dashing a quick “OMG — Mr. Darcy is SO EFFING CUTE. Enclosed: daguerreotype of kitten playing harpsichord.” [Keep Reading]

Regret Everything: OMG, We’re All Writers! [Full Post]

In “Regret Everything,” comedian Will Hines gives a weekly update on the thoughts that are gnawing at his brain.

It’s ironic that as technology gets more and more magical that the oldest of mediums — the written word — has come back so strongly. I communicate almost completely by typing these days. I recently emailed someone, “is there anyway we could talk with our voices to figure this out” before I remembered that I was sending that message over an actual phone.

And that’s not just me. Everyone is focused on writing FIRST. Sure, it’s mostly in short bursts: Facebook status, twitter bios, YouTube comments, smart phone email signature, clever IM handles, inside jokes in passwords, tumblr re-blogs and gchats. But still, it’s words. We are all writers, even if it’s just 140 characters at a time.

The last time culture was probably so tied to writing might be the pre-telephone era of the late 1800s. In London, the post (yeah that’s right, I said “the post,” which impossible to hear in anything but a British accent) would deliver letters up to five times a day. It was common then to receive a message, read it with the postman standing there, and dash off a quick note for him to take with him. It’s not so hard to imagine Jane Austen dashing a quick “OMG — Mr. Darcy is SO EFFING CUTE. Enclosed: daguerreotype of kitten playing harpsichord.” [Keep Reading]